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Briefs: “Gay Marriage Already Won,” Kathy and Anderson Wear Bibs, and “The Big Wedding” Wastes A Big Name Cast

  • Birthday shoutouts go to Gareth David-Lloyd (above), who is 32, Dianne Wiest is 65, and Reba McEntire is 58.
  • EW.com has a new teaser for Behind The Candelabra, which shows a a hand double, a glass smashing, and “Wow!.”

  • Below you can see the latest Old Dogs & New Tricks, with a fantasy Dynasty style pool fight, and Ross delivers an unexpected package. And it’s C.O.D. (and the C ain’t for cash!)

  • Below you can see the trailer for The Big Wedding, which stars Robert De Niro, Diane Keaton, Susan Sarandon, Amanda Seyfried, Katherine Heigl, Topher Grace, Ben Barnes, and Robin Williams, and looks … painfully generic.

  • Luke Grimes, who you may remember from Brothers & Sisters, has joined the cast of Season Six of True Blood: He’ll play “Wes, a 27-year-old, sexy, spiritual, compassionate, intelligent, protective, deeply emotional, and guitar-playing vampire who was turned in the ‘70s.” Yeah, yeah, yeah, how nude are we talking?

  • We’ve got two clips with Anderson and Kathy. First up, they discuss the New Year’s Eve show, and the “sardine kissing.”

  • And here they are trying on … adult bibs.

  • Introducing our new feature – The Weekly ShoutOUT™. Each week we’re going to focus on one out athlete/performer and feature a daily pic and career timeline. We’ll be showcasing the big names, but also the lesser-known gay celebs who deserve more recognition. This week we give a ShoutOUT to … Luke Macfarlane. Luke has scored guest shots recently on Beauty & The Beast and Person Of Interest, and starred on stage in The Normal Heart. Below you can see him with Brant Daugherty, attending the Barbara Tag in Munich in December. Tomorrow – We’ve saved the best for last!

  • Continuing the Top 50 Movie Songs Of The 80′s! At #15 is … “Maniac” by Michael Sembello, from Flashdance.

  • We’ll see the other smash from the Flashdance soundtrack, well, let’s just say “later,” but here’s Michael Sembello‘s synthpop classic. It debuted on the chart on June 4th, 1983 and spent two weeks at #1 beginning on September 10th. Tomorrow’s clue – “Flowing through my body is a river of surprise.”

  • The 100 Greatest Lost Hits Of The 80′s countdown may be over, but every Thursday we’re going to travel back again and pay tribute to an 80′s tune that should have been a bigger hit. This week, it’s “Automatic Man’” by Michael Sembello!. Yep, let’s continue this tour of Michael’s career with his other top 40 hit. “Automatic Man” is, truth be told, almost as awesome as “Maniac,” and has the added benefit of a batshit video. It peaked at #34 in November 1983.

  • Congrats to

    stormymac27

    , who was the first to correctly guess that yesterday’s Pixuzzle™ © ® was Superman III (And props to
    MoroccanMo, who guessed Superman … on Tuesday)

  • Here’s today’s Pixuzzle™ © ®. Below you can see characters from a famous movie. Can you name it?

 

And today’s Briefs are brought to you by…

 

Teaser Photo: 
  • snicks
  • March 28, 2013 4:31 pm

Ask JT! The Woes of a 25-Year-Old Virgin and a Lady with Bigoted Parents

Your friendly neighborhood bartender is taking a break from his wild dating life to tackle your questions with his patented blend of advice and adult beverages. So slide on up to the bar my friends. Now, what can I get you?

Hey JT,

I am going to be turning 25 this year and still have not had a boyfriend or lost my virginity. I have dated a few guys but it never seems to go anywhere, and I have always wanted to wait for the right person and be in a relationship when I lose my virginity. I am not ugly – I’m not saying I’m the hottest guy either – but I do get a lot of guys coming up to me at bars or clubs.

When they do, I feel so lost and unsure of what to do. In the back of my head I am constantly worried about what they will think when they find out. We live in a sex-filled society and I feel so segregated from everyone, like I’m the last of my kind. I am starting to get frustrated because I feel like I am missing out on a lot of experiences and wonder if sometimes it might just be best to get it out of the way. I was hoping you could give me some advice on maybe what I should do. Maybe some advice on how to talk to guys or how to maybe spot the right guy or even a decent guy, anything you think could help me.

Thank you,

25 and Lost

As we’ve seen over and over again, 25AL, there is nothing unusual about a 25-year-old virgin, so take this “last of your kind” business and curb-stomp it out of your mind.

Wait, that came off as harsh. I meant to say that while you are, indeed, a beautiful unique snowflake, you’re not the only virgin your age, believe me.

Here’s the secret to talking to dudes (and chicks, and everything in between, for that matter): confidence. People are attracted to other people who are sure of themselves. Think about the people you’ve been attracted throughout your life. Chances are one of the things they all shared was confidence.

Yes, yes, I know some people go gaga over wallflowers and shy girls and emo guys who cry in their rooms while listening to The Cure. But for the overwhelming majority of people, when they’re looking for luuurve, they’re looking for someone confident enough to sweep them off their feet. Self-assuredness (not to be confused with arrogance, and there’s a fine line) is just damn sexy.

So here’s the deal, 25AL. You’ve got dudes coming up to you at bars. Right there that means that physically, you’ve got it going on, and you have every right to enjoy that. Embrace your inner and outer hottie, and let that fuel you with a little healthy self-esteem.

Here’s what you should NOT do:

1) Rehearse pick-up lines

2) Scowl or act above the bar you’re hanging out in

3) Throw, as the kids say, “shade”

It’s amazing how many young gaylings I see in bars do those things, and they rarely if ever work. Be friendly and positive, but most of all be yourself. Confidence, unlike having “game” or “swagger,” comes from a place of authenticity, not showmanship.

But all this is advice on how to play the game when you’re out on the town. What I suggest, like I’ve done before, is that the best ways to meet decent dudes is to get involved with groups centered around activities that you enjoy. That can be volunteering for a charity, joining a hiking group, anything that gets you around other like-minded gay men in a non-pressure atmosphere.

 

Hey JT,

I’m a straight woman with a loving boyfriend who is a fierce advocate of gay marriage. My boyfriend and I aren’t engaged, and don’t plan to get married, not out of any political belief but simply because we don’t want to be married ourselves.

However, my family’s convinced this is out of protest, like how some people say “I won’t get married until all Americans can.” On top of that, my family (especially my parents) are opposed to marriage equality, and it’s gotten to the point where I can barely stand to be in the same room as them. They hit all the wrong talking points – it’s “in the Bible,” “children deserve a mother and father,” etc.

Any advice on how to reconnect with my family, or even if I should, considering their bigotry? Things have never been tenser.

Estranged Daughter

Unfortunately, I have some bad news, ED. While some parents are humble enough to acquiesce to their children’s wisdom, many are not … and therein lies a huge problem.

Parents, from the day we’re born, take on the job of instilling in us what they consider to be sound moral values. If we grow up and diverge from their teachings, human nature is to try and shepherd us back onto what they think is the right path. It takes an incredible human being to open one’s mind and realize the pupil can become the teacher.

Because of this, issues that tend to have generational divides – and marriage equality is THE issue of today that falls into that category – can make for some very uncomfortable holiday dinners.

You can always approach discussions with your parents the way you would with anyone who’s on the opposite side of the aisle – by using cold, hard facts. Facts like saying “it’s in the Bible” is meaningless, because the book that calls homosexuality an abomination also has a fierce taboo against tearing your clothes, mixing your fabrics, or keeping your hair unkempt, and if your parents lived through the 80’s my guess is they did all of those things. And that’s not even mentioning the seventy-three other things on that list.)

You can also point out that while it would be fan-effing-tastic for all children to be raised by their biological mother and father, the fact remains we have far more orphaned children in this country than we have parents to take them in, and gay couples who are adopting are not tearing these children out of the arms of loving, committed straight couples. They’re taking them out of a life where they’re raised by the government, absent individual love and attention that only a parent can give.

But again, people don’t like to change their minds, and (forgive me, but) that seems to increase the older someone gets. And some people are especially reluctant to have their minds changed by the very person they’re supposed to be teaching. So that leads you with the following options:

1) You can ignore the issues that divide you and agree that you’ll never come to an agreement, so for the sake of your continuing relationship you’ll just have to suck it up and not discuss this, or …

2) You can passionately argue to your parents that for you this isn’t just a political stance – this is about what’s doing what’s morally right, and if they can’t see things your way, you can’t break bread with them anymore, or …

3) You can agree to disagree for now, and then slowly, like a stealthy ethical ninja, you can explain and illustrate through examples why it’s so unjust to keep your fellow Americans from enjoying the same rights as you. I’m not saying it’ll be easy, and I’m definitely not saying it will lead to your parents posting a red equals sign instead of selfies on their Facebook page, but maybe, over time, they may evolve, as so many people seem to do these days.

Hey JT,

Quick bartending question. I’ve been trying to make frozen cosmos, and I saw on your twitter that you made them. Mine always come out too liquidy, like I just made a regular cosmo and put crushed ice in it. What’s the recipe you use?

Freeze your cranberry juice. Seriously.

I’m pretty proud of this, actually, because I didn’t read it anywhere and just came up with it myself. But I was having the same problem you were, and then it dawned on me to freeze the cranberry juice in an ice tray. So here’s the breakdown. For one cosmo, you need:

Four count of vodka
Two count of Triple Sec of Cointreau (Triple Sec is cheaper)
Four frozen cranberry juice cubes
Four ice cubes
Juice squeezed from 1/2 lime

Throw it all in the blender and go to town.

Quick advice about the cranberry juice cubes: unlike regular ice cubes, they’re sticky and can be hard to get out of the ice tray in an orderly way, so turn the ice cube tray over onto a cutting board, collect all of the cubes in a bowl, and put them in the freezer. You’re much less likely to make a mess.

Enjoy!


To ask JT a question, email him at jtadvicecolumn@gmail.com. Or you can be super tech-sexy and ask via Twitter. Messages may be edited for space (but they’re totally more likely to get chosen if they’re three paragraphs or less. Just sayin’.)


You can find previous editions of AfterElton’s Ask JT advice column here.


Column Tags: 
Teaser Photo: 
  • xanderoz
  • March 28, 2013 12:17 pm

Watch! Nine Memorable Max Moments From Season Three Of “Happy Endings”

Happy Endings has had a troubled (to say the least) Season Three, as mediocre ratings and bizarre timeslot shifts (Sundays at 10 PM. Really?) have put Season Four into much doubt. ABC is giving the show one more chance, if you can call it that, by thr…

  • snicks
  • March 28, 2013 12:19 pm

Happy 27th Birthday, Lady Gaga! Let’s Rank Her 27 Best Songs.

Lady Gaga turns 27 today. Ugh, Madonna invented that in 1985.

Just kidding. Since I had such a good time toasting Mariah Carey‘s extensive canon yesterday, I thought we’d take a chance on another birthday girl today. Bow down to Stefani Germanotta, a.k.a. Lady Gaga, who will no doubt kick off another spectacular year of LGBT activism and phenomenal pop culture sorcery beginning today. I hope she’s wearing only the sleekest wig, blazer, and leotard set as I write this.

Shall we rank the superstar’s 27 greatest songs, kids? I apologize for what I’ve left off, but I’ll leave “marrying the night” to you SCOTUS-approaching domestic types. 

27. “Boys, Boys, Boys”

Boys in cars, boys in bars! The Dr. Seuss version of boy-craziness.

26. “Christmas Tree”

Aggressive, Christmas-themed innuendo. She’s the STAR ON TOP, everyone.

25. “Speechless”

Elton John by way of Billy Joel by way of drunken teenage poetry. 

24. “Hair”

Pure madness and the pure opposite of India.Arie‘s “I Am Not My Hair.” 

23. “Bad Kids”

Born This Way‘s bubblegummiest moment of rebellion.

22. “Americano”

Has “meeting a girl in East L.A.” ever sounded so grand and rambunctious?

21. “Eh, Eh (Nothing Else I Can Say)”

Laid-back, good-time transcendence. And an underrated, candy-colored video!

20. “Bloody Mary”

The weirdest moment on Born This Way has moments of sweet contemplation in its slow rave.

19. “Scheiße”

Wait, maybe this is the weirdest moment on Born This Way. Like a Marlene Dietrich monologue on club drugs.

18. “The Fame”

I loved Gaga’s original purpose: to mock, satirize, condemn, and adore fame. 

17. ”The Edge of Glory”

Tones of Springsteen, urgency of Journey.

16. “Starstruck”

Blowing your heart up with deadpan rap since 2008.

15. “Born This Way”

Jokes aside, this LGBT-riffic anthem makes you want to express yourself.

14. “Paparazzi”

Slightly pretentious, yes, but Gaga makes that an endearing, cheeky pose in this wacky number.

13. ”Dance in the Dark” 

For my money, her most glorious Madonna-tinged pop jam. The longing dancefloor shout is pure Madge.

12. “Government Hooker”

An operatic, industrial-rock dance jam. This is Erotica‘s impish niece.

11. “Monster”

An anthem for millions of Gaga devotees and Boris Karloff.

10. “So Happy I Could Die”

I honestly think this is one of Gaga’s most emotional songs. The lilting delivery of “…’Cuz we’re having a good time” is poignant — and eerie!

9. “You and I”

Her greatest and most anthemic rock ballad, full stop. 

8. “Alejandro”

This song never got enough credit — a tribute to ABBA and Ace of Base with kickass verses and even Spanish flair! 

7. “I Like It Rough”

I love the vulnerability in a line like “Loving me’s like chewing on pearls” and the daring plainspokenness of a line like, “You’re probably wondering why I like it rough.”

6. “LoveGame”

All hail the disco stick! I’m sure many of you have. 

5. “Judas”

A dizzier “Bad Romance” with schizo vocal flourishes and a phenomenal spoken-word breakdown. Pure Gaga. 

4. “Telephone”

It’s Gaga’s “Material Girl” — a lighthearted jab at the modern, impersonal, technological static between us all.

3. “Bad Romance”

A spooky, winking, polished explosion of style and nerve. Hitchcock would’ve loved it, and not just because his work is referenced by name.

2. “Just Dance”

Gaga’s been a badass time and again, but maybe nothing will ever feel as rebellious as when she burst onto the scene boasting, “Wish I could shut my playboy mouth” and hollering at RedOne.

1. “Poker Face”

There can be no other. From the blatant sexual metaphors (including the infamous “bluffing with my muffin” line) to the ingenious, guttural “muh-muh-muh-muuhhhhs” that drone throughout the song, this song is a one-of-a-kind sensation on a lyrical, libidinous, and pure pop level. And it’s still my favorite Gaga video too.

Your turn. What’s the birthday girl’s best work?

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  • virtel
  • March 28, 2013 8:21 am

Brent Hartinger’s “The Elephant of Surprise” Brings The Charm

You cannot walk into the Young Adult Fiction section of a bookstore these days and not be confronted with an endless and soulless supply of Twilight clones, Hunger Games knock-offs and Harry Potter replicas. Don’t even get me started on those racks full of CW shows disguised, just barely, as literature.

It’s entirely possible to forget that novels assembled with the time-tested building blocks — interesting characters, genuine emotions, relatable situations — are still capable of providing us with enormous pleasure. Even without the help of sparkling vampires.

Thankfully such pleasures are more than abundant in Brent Hartinger’s latest novel, The Elephant of Surprise. And by the time I closed the last page, I was smiling, uplifted and charmed by a novel that transported me completely to a time when love was strange and magical. Young love, as Hartinger’s novels effortlessly reminds, is about the purest kind there is.

Elephant, the fourth book in a series that began with Geography Club and includes The Order of the Poison Oak and the dual perspective novel Double Feature: Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies, continues the often funny and touching trials and tribulations of gay seventeen-year-old Russell Middlebrook.

You need not have read the previous three books to follow along, but there’s no reason to deny yourself the fun of reading them anyway.

Full disclosure: Hartinger, along with his partner Michael Jensen are former editors of AfterElton and were instrumental in my becoming a writer for the site. This, however, did not influence my review. Thank goodness it is a wonderful book or that would have made Twitter very, um, awkward.

The novel begins with Russel, still only a junior in high school, facing the realization that, because of the physical distance between them, his relationship with boyfriend Otto has downshifted from “great, odds-overcoming love” to the dreaded, chat-room based “friend zone”.

With his friends Min and Gunnar in complicated relationships of their own, Russel decides that romance is simply not worth the bother and declares himself “done with love” even as he’s gravitating towards ex-boyfriend Kevin (and hating himself for it).

His anti-love stance soon takes a detour because of a chance encounter with a young man named Wade, an obviously intelligent and, to Russel’s consternation and hormonal curiosity, highly attractive Freegan.

Yes, Freegan. For those not yet in the know, Freegans are a group of people who are decidedly and staunchly “anti-consumerist” and only use or consume food, clothing or other items that have been donated or discarded. As it regards the first time Russell lays eyes on Wade, I have to say it is the first meet-cute I’ve ever read with one character in a dumpster. And somehow, that worked with me.

Despite not knowing whether Wade is gay, bisexual or none of the above, Russel finds himself hanging out at trash sites and scoping homeless encampments just hoping to see Wade again and the novel perfectly captures the embarrassing, dignity-eschewing lengths we go to when we want to extend a chance encounter.

I will, of course, not reveal much in the way of the novel’s considerable developments. Let’s just say that the Shakespearian adage, “The course of true love never did run smooth,” holds quite firmly here.

I will, however, commend this book for its beguiling charm. Much like in Poison Oak, my favorite of the series so far, Hartinger creates a world here that is realistic and appropriate to the age group he’s writing for and about. The book is subtly nostalgic too, which makes it a bit magical for a reader in his late 30’s. Yes, I’m talking about me.

Hartinger is also not afraid to make his protagonist look and sound a little foolish. Russel narrates the story, so we are with the character every step of his journey, even while knowing he’s about to make mistakes writ large and small. We know this because, in our teenage years, we’ve made similar mistakes. What was painful once has, in time, transformed into memories that are still cringe-inducing but also incredibly comical. It’s a rather vivid reaction — one that is only finessed from us due to some beautiful writing.

I also continue to admire and celebrate the series for its matter-of-fact approach to diversity. Especially this book. It never feels shoehorned in or written with capitol letter PURPOSE. It’s a simple reflection of the world we live in, by people who notice and simply don’t care all that much.

For example, because a sentence like that requires one, Wade is African-American. He’s also a bit of a cypher in the beginning, gradually revealing himself to Russell and to us. We’re drawn in because Russel is drawn in. First physically, then emotionally.

Readers will, no doubt, clue me in to other fiction novels that accomplish the same feat, but it’s the first time I can recall ever having read the candid thoughts of a gay white male regarding his attraction to a black male that wasn’t loaded down with stereotyping and racial junk. Russel briefly wonders to himself what it would feel like to kiss a black person but dismisses this as an errant thought and simply pursues the object of his affection without reservation. This stuck me as quietly, but thrillingly revolutionary.

Elephant may not be all perfect. One character has some important information to tell another character but is constantly prevented from doing so because that would reduce the story by about a hundred pages. But this is nitpicking. While such minor contrivances may take us briefly out of the narrative, they are never lasting enough to detract from the next humorous or intriguing plot development around the corner.

Through it all, Russel remains a young guy trying to do the right thing for himself and the people he cares about. While he sometimes misses the mark, he tries hard and more then often succeeds. That spirit is not only a significant part of the character’s charm, it is also a crucial element that makes Elephant (and the series as a whole) ultimately heartening and special.

Hartinger’s latest novel may not involve spells or shape-shifting and it may not command a shelf full of derivative clones. But it is storytelling that is alive and uplifting and, as a Freegan would no doubt say, a delightful bit of treasure in the trash heap.

 
The Elephent of Surprise is available now at Amazon and other booksellers. You can find out more about the novels of Brent Hartinger at his website brenthartinger.com.

 

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  • March 28, 2013 9:04 am

TV on Tap: “Burn Notice” Gets Adrian Pasdar, NBC Considers a “Chicago Fire” Spin-Off and Another “Southland” Star Packs Their Parachute


Raising Hope is so happy to end its season on a special night that it wants to sing and dance about it.

News

Since we know he won’t be returning to The Lying Game (if it gets to make more episodes) Adrian Pasdar has picked up a recurring role on Burn Notice, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He’ll play a former special ops solder who be using his training for less-than-noble pursuits. And hotness.

This year, the prestigious Peabody Awards handed out honors to Southland, Doctor Who, Girls, Louie and Switched at Birth. If Louis C.K. or Lena Dunham show up on The Colbert Report, prepare for a trophy-off.

Noting that there hasn’t been an episode written by a woman in sixty episodes, The Guardian calls for Doctor Who to put a greater effort at hiring more women and io9 wonders if this is why I found Amy Pond so thunderingly dull.

Shhh, I’m deep in my fantasy world where Regina King joining a pilot is just a sign that Southland is retooling next year, starting with a season premiere titled, “Cooper in Charge” (which, yes, will have a theme song where someone sings, “I want Coop in charge of me.” I hope you’ll be singing that all day.)

Before the fall season began Chicago Fire didn’t look like a show that would last long, but now it’s doing so well that Deadline reports that NBC is considering a spin-off that follows a different Public Safety division in Chicago.

The Watchowski siblings’ next project, Sense8 will be a 10-episode collaboration with J. Michael Straczynski that will debut on Netflix. I’m sure there are some very happy nerds dancing at the idea of such a combination.

It turns out that Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a fan of Bunheads. In a column for Esquire, he declares it “one of the best models for male behavior in teens” and, overall, finding the best role models for men in shows with female leads.

I’m not sure if I’m ready to move past the Ryan Lafferty days of Brothers & Sisters, but True Blood will test that as it introduces Luke Grimes in a recurring role this season. TVLine says Grimes will play a smart, deep and spiritual vampire who was turned back in the 70s.

What Classic Sitcoms Taught Us About Gay Rights. That episode of The Facts of Life totally went over my head as a kid.

I think Game of Thrones won the internet yesterday:

 

Listings

Anderson Live (syndicated) Check local listings
Yeah, the last few days have felt pretty phoned in but now Anderson brings in the big gun, he’s got Kathy Griffin as his co-host… and New Jersey housewife Caroline Manzo as an interview guest. Even if Kathy isn’t there for the interview, there’s got to be a bakstage moment or two that will make it into her next comedy special.

The View (ABC) Check local listings
Mario Cantone is co-hosting today’s show.

The Talk (CBS) Check local listings
Comedy legend Lily Tomlin will be chatting at the Talk table today.

Fall to Grace (HBO) 8:00 PM ET
Alexandra Pelosi‘s latest documentary follows former New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey who, after combining the coming out speech with the resigning from office in disgrace speech, went to divinity school and became an Episcopal priest. I usually find that Pelosi fails to do much more than scratch the surface with her subjects, so I’m not planning on watching this one with a lot of optimism. But maybe McGreevey will be the exception.

The Vampire Diaries (CW) 8:00 PM ET
Katherine and Elijah returning in the same episode? This show is truly trying to win me back. Too bad Rebekah is still around. And Klaus.

Raising Hope (Fox) 9:00 PM ET
It’s a season finale double-feature that puts the extended Chance family in the spotlight. Shirley Jones and Lee Majors guest as Burt‘s parents — who tell him he’s actually Jewish. A Bar Mitzvah ensues.

Project Runway (Lifetime) 9:00 PM ET
Sigh. The design-a-textile challenge used to inspire such excitement in me, but this season we’ve got such a sad sack of designers that even sending them to the Guggenheim for inspiration feels… uninspiring. Honestly, I’d rather watch Archer. Speaking of…

Archer (FX) 10:00 PM ET
You knew eventually someone on Archer would end up telling Pam to to “Get off the Pope”, but I always figured it would happen either during one of those wacky ISIS work trips or when it turned out that the Pope was a big fan of Pam’s fight club. Instead, it’s happening during Pam’s first mission as an ISIS agent.

Scandal (ABC) 10:00 PM ET
I guess I can keep from screaming “Why isn’t he dead yet!” whenever Hollis shows up on screen to watch as Pope & Associates try to recover his kidnapped daughter. I figure the kidnapping was done by someone who was injured when they slipped and fell on Hollis’ trail of slime.

Kathy (Bravo) 11:30 PM ET
Kathy wraps up her second season with Eva Longoria and Josh Groban.

Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (NBC) 12:35 AM ET
Former Queer Eye design guy Thom Filicia is set to chat with Jimmy tonight.

What will you be watching tonight? Please share in the comments!

Tomorrow’s Preview

Anderson Live (syndicated) Check local listings
Julianne Moore is visiting Anderson tomorrow.

The Talk (CBS) Check local listings
Kistin Chenoweth‘s scheduled for tomorrow’s show.

 

Tags: 
Teaser Photo: 
  • LyleMasaki
  • March 28, 2013 5:01 am